German idiom - einen Kater haben

Having been away for a few days I only just got the chance to read the Christmas edition of the German magazine Stern when the above advert caught my eye. It was advertising the Christmas Day film ‘Der gestiefelte Kater’ (Puss in Boots) with the sentence ‘Haben Sie Weihnachten auch ‘nen (that’s short for ‘einen’) Kater?

Great sentence –  Are you also having a tomcat this Christmas?

Or could it mean something else?

‘Einen Kater haben’ also means ‘to have a  hangover’ – probably very appropriate during the festive season  😉

If you read the sentence ‘Ich habe einen Kater.’ on its own, you wouldn’t know what the person is talking about. Listening, however, will tell you. The tone and facial expression will tell you exactly, whether it’s a tomcat or too much alcohol the night before .

So my question today is: “Hatten Sie am 1. Januar einen Kater?”
How would you answer? Did you have a hangover on the 1st of January or are you the proud owner of a tomcat?

Do tell! I promise I won’t pass it on  😆

 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Did you enjoy this article?
Subscribe for Updates
Subscribe to my monthly newsletter and receive a free eBook with over 100 free German online resources!
Tagged with →  

5 Responses to German idiom – einen Kater haben

  1. My tomcat has a hangover. How do we handle this in German? 😉

  2. No tomcat, no hangover. Reminds me we have bottles of cherry brandy and apricot brandy from Lidl!

  3. […] calendar German idiom – einen Kater haben Where can I read Grimm’s Fairy Tales? By Angelika Davey On January 4, 2014 · Add […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this:

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close