50+ fascinating language facts - an infographic

50+ Fascinating Language Facts You Didn't Know Infographic

Another one of those lovely elearning infographics  with 51 interesting language facts, including three facts about German which you may or may not know:

  • The first printed book was in German. And many more afterwards. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could read some of them in their original language?
  • German is the most spoken language in Europe. Four countries have it as their official language. → A great reason to learn German, don’t you think?
  • German words can have three genders: masculine, feminine, and neuter. Most languages only have either masculine or feminine. → Of course, if you are one of my students or a regular reader of my blog, you know that!

Two more very interesting facts:

  • On average, people only use a few hundred words in daily conversation, while most languages have 50,000+ words. → A few hundred German words can therefore be enough to have a conversation with Germans.
  • At least half of the world’s population is bilingual! → And if you’re learning German, you are one of them!

50+ Fascinating Language Facts You Didn't Know Infographic
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4 Responses to 50+ fascinating language facts – an infographic

  1. I learned a lot from this post. When does the neuter gender get used in German? This is a new concept to me.

  2. James hamilton says:

    I have been studying German Grammar for more than a year and I can only speak or write in simple beginners sentence’s. Perhaps I am studying too much grammar

    • I don’t think you can study too much grammar, but you need to include something for all four skills. Are you practising your reading, speaking listening and writing? Also, how much time did you spent? Five minutes per day or an hour? I’ve had students before you had studies German for over a year but because of work commitments they had to cancel lessons. For them being able to speak simple sentences was progress. So, without knowing how much and what exactly you did while learning it’s difficult to gauge if you should be able to do more. Email me if you would like some personal suggestions of what you could do.

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